Woman’s Skin Cancer Selfie Sparks Awareness

Tweet By Robert Preidt HealthDay Reporter WEDNESDAY, Dec. 13, 2017 (HealthDay News) — You don’t have to be famous for your public health message to reach millions. A new case study describes how Tawny Dzierzek, a young nurse from Kentucky, posted a startling selfie on social media in April 2015, shortly after she had a skin cancer treatment. Dzierzek was a regular user...
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Another Legacy of Terror Attacks: Migraines

Tweet Continued Tension-type headaches were even more common, affecting half of female survivors and 28 percent of male survivors. Overall, terror attack survivors had a three- to four-times higher risk for both types of headache, the study found. That was the case even when other factors, such as past exposure to violence, were considered. According to Stensland, the disparity mainly showed up in...
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Many With Early Breast Cancer Are Skipping Chemo

Tweet By Robert Preidt HealthDay Reporter WEDNESDAY, Dec. 13, 2017 (HealthDay News) — Fewer women with early stage breast cancer are turning to chemotherapy to fight their disease, a new study finds. “For patients with early stage breast cancer, we’ve seen a significant decline in chemotherapy use over the last few years without a real change in evidence,”...
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Zika Babies Facing More Health Problems With Age

Tweet By Margaret Farley Steele HealthDay Reporter THURSDAY, Dec. 14, 2017 (HealthDay News) — Most children born with brain abnormalities caused by the Zika virus are facing severe health and developmental challenges at 2 years of age, a new study suggests. These problems may include seizures, an inability to sit independently as well as problems with sleep, feeding, hearing...
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Could a Hot Cup of Tea Preserve Your Vision?

Tweet Continued Of nearly 1,700 survey participants, 5 percent had glaucoma. Overall, Coleman’s team found, the odds of having glaucoma were 74 percent lower among people who said they drank hot tea more than six times a week, versus non-drinkers. That was with a number of other factors taken into account — including age, weight, diabetes and smoking habits. Still, it’s impossible...
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Feeling Sexually Harassed? You’re Not Alone

Tweet By Serena Gordon HealthDay Reporter THURSDAY, Dec. 14, 2017 (HealthDay News) — Before the #MeToo movement and the fall of numerous powerful men accused of sexual harassment, researchers surveyed thousands of women and found the problem to be widespread. The poll, conducted last winter by Harvard researchers, found those women most likely to report sexual harassment were...
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Excess Weight May Raise Rosacea Risk

Tweet By Maureen Salamon HealthDay Reporter FRIDAY, Dec. 15, 2017 (HealthDay News) — The skin disorder rosacea should be added to the list of chronic diseases linked to obesity, researchers report. Their large new study found that the risk for rosacea increases among women as weight rises. The researchers reviewed the records of nearly 90,000 U.S. women, tracked over 14 years....
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New Cancer Drug Shows Promise Against Many Tumors

Tweet By EJ Mundell HealthDay Reporter FRIDAY, Dec. 15, 2017 (HealthDay News) — A new drug that targets a genetic flaw common to most cancer cells is showing potency against many tumor types. The preliminary trial of a drug called ulixertinib was conducted with 135 patients who had already failed treatments for one of a variety of advanced, solid tumors. Researchers led by Dr....
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Today Is the Deadline for Obamacare 2018

Tweet By Dennis Thompson HealthDay Reporter FRIDAY, Dec. 15, 2017 (HealthDay News) — Today marks the end of the shortened sign-up period for most Americans to buy health insurance through the federal Affordable Care Act (Obamacare) marketplace. Dec. 15 is the last enrollment day for people living in 39 states served by the HealthCare.gov website. At the site, people can pick...
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Mom’s Blood Sugar Tied To Baby’s Heart Defect Odds

Tweet By Robert Preidt HealthDay Reporter FRIDAY, Dec. 15, 2017 (HealthDay News) — It’s long been known that diabetes in pregnancy raises the odds for congenital heart defects. But new research shows that the threat may also extend to women who simply have high blood sugar levels — not just full-blown diabetes. “This finding may have a profound effect on how...
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