Measles Returns to California for 2020

Tweet Feb. 10, 2020 — Measles has hit the Los Angeles area again, with five new confirmed cases. An international traveler who was not vaccinated had measles and exposed four local residents, public health officials confirm. Another case was confirmed in northern California on Friday, according to Jayleen Richards, a public information officer for Solano County Public Health. She gave few details,...
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Testosterone Has Different Effect in Men and Women

Tweet Overactive Bladder Assessment: Could You Live Better? By Steven Reinberg HealthDay Reporter MONDAY, Feb. 10, 2020 (HealthDay News) — High levels of the sex hormone testosterone may trigger different health problems in men and women, a new study reveals. In women, testosterone may increase the risk for type 2 diabetes, while in men it lowers that risk. But high levels of testosterone...
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LGBT Teens Still Plagued by Suicidal Thoughts

Tweet Living With Sexually Transmitted Disease By Amy Norton HealthDay Reporter MONDAY, Feb. 10, 2020 (HealthDay News) — Suicidal behavior is declining among U.S. teenagers who identify as LGBT, but the problem remains pervasive. That’s the conclusion of two new studies that tracked trends among U.S. teenagers over the past couple of decades. Over the years, more kids have...
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Baby in Your Room? Yes. Baby in Your Bed? No.

Tweet Get Help for Your Baby’s Eczema By Serena Gordon HealthDay Reporter MONDAY, Feb. 10, 2020 (HealthDay News) — Parents have long been told that babies should sleep in their own crib to reduce the risk of sudden unexpected infant death (SUID), yet nearly 1 in 5 infant are still sleeping in their parent’s bed, a new study finds. To decrease the risk of SUID, or sudden...
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General Anesthesia Ups Postpartum Depression Risk

Tweet MONDAY, Feb. 10, 2020 (HealthDay News) — Women who receive general anesthesia during a cesarean section delivery are at higher risk of severe postpartum depression that requires hospitalization, as well as self-inflicted harm and suicidal thoughts, a new study finds. Researchers from Columbia University analyzed more than 428,000 discharge records of women who delivered by C-section in...
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Antibody Found That May Help Autoimmune Disorders

Tweet What is Adult Whooping Cough? By Robert Preidt HealthDay Reporter WEDNESDAY, Feb. 12, 2020 (HealthDay News) — Researchers who have pinpointed an antibody linked to life-threatening autoimmune disorders in children say their discovery could lead to faster diagnosis and treatment of these patients. The investigators identified the myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein (MOG) antibody...
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Were You Born in an H1N1 Flu Year or an H3N2? It Matters

Tweet TUESDAY, Feb. 11, 2020 (HealthDay News) — The first type of influenza virus you’re exposed to may set your lifetime ability to fight the flu. Researchers with McMaster University and University of Montreal found that being born in an H1N1 year or an H3N2 year matters. Following a phenomenon known as antigenic imprinting, the study revealed that early exposure to one of these two...
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Golf May Be a Recipe for Longevity

Tweet Feb. 12, 2020 — If you’re a senior, playing golf regularly may do more than improve your swing: New research suggests it could reduce your risk of early death. Researchers followed nearly 5,900 adults, 65 and older, for 10 years and found that those who were regular golf players (at least once a month) were more than 8% less likely to die from any cause than non-golfers, CNN reported. The...
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Quarantined for Coronavirus: What It’s Like

Tweet Not Quite Home CDC officials have said they are trying to make life in quarantine as comfortable as possible. The evacuees are not restricted to their rooms but are requested to keep a ”social” distance of about 6 feet from other families; children should not share toys. “We can walk around the hotel,” Wei says. ”They have fencing outside. I try to take them out...
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As Liquor Stores Close, Murder Rates Decline

Tweet THURSDAY, Feb. 13, 2020 (HealthDay News) — Having fewer liquor stores in cities may lead to lower murder rates, a new study suggests. The implication of alcohol zoning regulations can have life-or-death consequences — at least in Baltimore, according to study author Pamela Trangenstein, of the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, and colleagues. “There is an ongoing...
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