Cycling Won’t Sabotage a Man’s Sex Life: Study

Tweet By Maureen Salamon HealthDay Reporter WEDNESDAY, Jan. 17, 2018 (HealthDay News) — Men who are avid cyclists needn’t worry that hours spent on the bike will translate into problems in the bedroom or bathroom, new research claims. Reportedly the largest study of its kind involving bikers, swimmers and runners, the findings buck prior reports that cycling could harm...
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Morning Sickness Drug May Not Work: Study

Tweet By Dennis Thompson HealthDay Reporter WEDNESDAY, Jan. 17, 2018 (HealthDay News) — The most commonly prescribed medicine for morning sickness may not work, a new report contends. The drug, Diclegis, failed to meet minimum effectiveness goals in the clinical trial relied upon by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration for its approval in 2013, Canadian researchers reported. “There...
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Breast-Feed Now, Stave Off Diabetes Later

Tweet By Serena Gordon HealthDay Reporter TUESDAY, Jan. 16, 2018 (HealthDay News) — It’s often said breast-feeding is best for babies, but new research suggests it also might have a significant long-term benefit for moms — preventing type 2 diabetes. “We found that a longer duration of breast-feeding was associated with a substantially lower risk of type 2...
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Can Crystals Heal? Separating Facets from Facts

Tweet {{#each webmd_rendition.content.wbmd_asset.content_section.cons_slideshow.slide_group}} {{/each}} Jan. 16, 2018 — When Sadie Kadlec approached her boss at a high-end fashion firm in New York City to ask for a raise a few years ago, she secretly clutched two small pebbles in her right hand. One was an orange crystal called carnelian, said to promote courage; the other, a...
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CVS: No More Photo Touchups in Beauty Product Ads

Tweet Photos in advertising for  its beauty products will no longer have significant touchups, CVS says. The pharmacy giant said Monday that it will not “materially” alter photos produced by the company and used in stores or on websites or social media, the Associated Pressreported. If suppliers use altered photos in their marketing materials, they will be labeled. The policy change...
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Will These 2 Home Remedies Help Your Sore Throat?

Tweet By Dennis Thompson HealthDay Reporter MONDAY, Dec. 18, 2017 (HealthDay News) — Down go another two worthless home remedies for strep throat. Neither sugarless gum nor probiotics help to treat the symptoms or speed up recovery from a sore throat caused by bacterial infection, a new clinical trial reports. Doctors had thought that gum sweetened by xylitol, a sugar substitute,...
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Flu Vaccine Could Work as Well as Last Year’s Shot: Study

Tweet By Steven Reinberg HealthDay Reporter MONDAY, Dec. 18, 2017 (HealthDay News) — As the flu barrels across the United States, the good news is that this year’s vaccine may work better than many expected. The flu has reached epidemic proportions in seven of the 10 regions in the country, according to Lynnette Brammer, an epidemiologist in the U.S. Centers for Disease...
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FDA to Get More Aggressive on Homeopathic Meds

Tweet Dec. 18. 2017 — The FDA is adopting a more aggressive stance when it comes to regulating homeopathic remedies. The agency says it will focus its enforcement efforts on products that are especially risky because of who they’re meant to treat, how they’re given, what they contain or whether or not there have been reports of safety problems about them. In draft guidelines issued today,...
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Woman’s Skin Cancer Selfie Sparks Awareness

Tweet By Robert Preidt HealthDay Reporter WEDNESDAY, Dec. 13, 2017 (HealthDay News) — You don’t have to be famous for your public health message to reach millions. A new case study describes how Tawny Dzierzek, a young nurse from Kentucky, posted a startling selfie on social media in April 2015, shortly after she had a skin cancer treatment. Dzierzek was a regular user...
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Another Legacy of Terror Attacks: Migraines

Tweet Continued Tension-type headaches were even more common, affecting half of female survivors and 28 percent of male survivors. Overall, terror attack survivors had a three- to four-times higher risk for both types of headache, the study found. That was the case even when other factors, such as past exposure to violence, were considered. According to Stensland, the disparity mainly showed up in...
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